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Kansas Woman Sues Uber for Getting a Driver Who Raped Her

Published on Mar 6, 2018 at 1:49 pm in Rideshare Accidents.

Do you have any idea who the driver of a rideshare vehicle is? Many people who use a service like Lyft or Uber in cities such as Las Vegas, or NYC, or Chicago believe that the driver has had a background check done prior to driving strangers around in a vehicle. Current drivers are indeed required to pass a background check, but every now and then a case happens where a driver falls through the cracks.

One such disturbing case was filed in June 2017. A Kansas City woman filed a lawsuit against Uber, saying a former driver with a criminal record raped her after driving her home in January. The lawsuit named two defendants– the company and the former driver, Yahkhahnahn Ammi. According to the lawsuit, Ammi drove the woman to multiple locations then talked his way into her home after driving her there. He then attacked her. The lawsuit alleges that Uber failed to act on earlier reports of Ammi assaulting others.

Man Drove for Uber After Deadly Crash in D.C. Metro Area

Published on Feb 28, 2018 at 1:37 pm in Uber Accidents.

Do you know what type of driver you will be getting before you enter an Uber vehicle? A man accused of hitting and killing a high school football coach on the Capital Beltway last summer while driving a box truck later drove for Uber after that deadly crash. Carlos Alberto Garcia, 42, killed 52-year-old Leonard Schultz in June 2017 when the box truck he was driving drifted into the median area at the split of westbound I-495 and I-95 South/I-495/I-395 North in Springfield and struck him, according to the VSP.

Garcia was initially charged with reckless driving after the crash, but federal authorities pulled his license to operate a commercial vehicle after discovering it was his second crash in less than 24 hours. This type of situation is devastating to imagine.

What Lawsuits Have Been Filed Against Uber?

Published on Feb 27, 2018 at 12:13 pm in Uber Accidents.

Many people are familiar with the popular ridesharing company, Uber, which takes away the stress of not having a car. You simply download the app, request a ride, and a car comes to pick you up and take you to your destination. But when car accidents factor in to the mix, it can get complicated. Uber has faced a number of lawsuits because of car accidents, treatment of employees, and sometimes their hiring processes.

Determining fault and settlements are difficult to do on your own. If you’ve been in a car accident with an Uber car, an Uber accident lawyer from the Rideshare Law Group can help you with your claim and get you a favorable settlement.

Model in ICU Month After DUI Driver Crashed into Uber in Hollywood

Published on Feb 23, 2018 at 11:37 am in Uber Accidents.

In February 2018, a Ukrainian model visiting Southern California got an Uber ride to see the city. Now, she is in the hospital. Liz Kuzmenko is in a UCLA Medical Center bed and wants to know when she can go back to work. The reality is that she’ll most likely be recovering for at least a couple of months before she can travel. It’s a far cry from where the aspiring model was just one month ago.

On New Year’s Eve, she went out with three friends: Jumping into an Uber around 6 a.m. on New Year’s Day seemed responsible, but a drunk driver, speeding south on Vista Street blew through a stop sign and T-boned the Prius driven by their Uber driver.

Are Uber and Lyft Drivers Really Independent Contractors?

Published on Feb 16, 2018 at 11:08 am in Rideshare Accidents.

Issues regarding the exact legal status of drivers for rideshare companies like Uber and Lyft are beginning to work their way into appellate courts.  Since our legal system is based on precedent, opinions by upper level courts are particularly useful for lawyers to predict how rideshare organizations should be treated at trial.

On January 24, 2018, the Commonwealth Court of Pennsylvania issued its opinion in the matter of Donald Lowman v. Unemployment Compensation Board of Review.  Mr. Lowman had been gainfully employed as a “behavioral health specialist” until June 2015.  He applied for unemployment compensation.  In August 2015, the Unemployment Compensation Service Center determined that Mr. Lowman was not entitled to benefits even though he had lost his job.  The basis for the initial conclusion was that his “enterprise” as an Uber driver rendered him ineligible for compensation.